INTRODUCTIONES ARTIS GRAMMATICE HEBRAICAE. Judaica, Alfonso de Zamora, Grammar.
INTRODUCTIONES ARTIS GRAMMATICE HEBRAICAE
INTRODUCTIONES ARTIS GRAMMATICE HEBRAICAE
INTRODUCTIONES ARTIS GRAMMATICE HEBRAICAE

INTRODUCTIONES ARTIS GRAMMATICE HEBRAICAE

[Alcala de Henares] Spain: Academy of Complutensi, 1526. First separate edition. Bound in vellum, title in manuscript on spine. 18 cm. 208, 39, (1) leaves. [Collated complete: leaves (1), A-Z L-8, AA-DD L-8, EE L-7, (1)]. Title page printed in red and black, skillfully repaired along top edge and lower outer corner, not affecting text. Printer's mark on title page; two neat ink notes in the margins ["ad deum, ad archiepiscopum"]; previous owner's signature on front endpaper; later bookplate on front pastedown. Margins trimmed, taking a few letters from the substantial ink marginalia in Latin and occasionally Hebrew. The text includes an extensive Latin-Hebrew grammar, Zamora's brief treatise on Hebrew orthography, and a letter by him, printed in Latin, interlined with Hebrew. The letter, entitled "A Letter from the Kingdom of Spain to the Jews in the Roman Community," encourages the Jews of Rome to convert to the Christian faith. Parts of Zamora's grammar originally appeared in the Polyglot Bible of 1515, published by the Complutensian University. Item #66601

In an article by Jesus de Prado Plumed, "The Commission of Targum Manuscripts and the Patronage of Christian Hebraism in Sixteenth-Century Castile," [Brill: 2014], the author notes that Alfonso Zamora and his publishing partner Pablo Nunez Coronel "occupied themselves throughout their professional lives as teachers of Hebrew and Aramaic, as textual scholars and as highly skilled professionals active in the book trade." Zamora was a converso, a converted Jew, one of many Spanish citizens forced to choose between expulsion or conversion during the Spanish Inquisition. Modern scholarship indicates he may have continued to practice his religion in secret. [see also the entry for Alfonso de Zamora by George Alexander Kohut in the Jewish Encyclopedia online].
ABPC records indicate the only copy offered at auction in the last 47 years was at Sotheby's in 1983, where it brought 3,080 British pounds.

Price: $8,500.00

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