THE JAMES MEANS CONTROL FOR FLYING MACHINES BASED UPON THE PRINCIPLE OF MENTAL AUTOMATISM. [caption title]
THE JAMES MEANS CONTROL FOR FLYING MACHINES BASED UPON THE PRINCIPLE OF MENTAL AUTOMATISM. [caption title]

THE JAMES MEANS CONTROL FOR FLYING MACHINES BASED UPON THE PRINCIPLE OF MENTAL AUTOMATISM. [caption title]

[Boston, Mass. nd] [1913?]. Circular, 28 x 21 cm., 2 pp. of text, and including an inset diagram, 13 x 10 cm., of the steering mechanism. A very good copy. "It will be seen in the diagram that the balancing motions of the aviator are natural, that is to say, in actuating the lateral and longitudinal rudders the movement of the handle-bars is in the direction which the swaying of the aviator's body would take if he sought to correct by his weight the rolling or pitching." The automatic balancing required for the flying machine is likened to riding a bicycle. If the novice is able to keep from falling, "he does so by extremely rapid thinking which is represented by wabbling. When, after some practice, the learner ceases to wabble, he has ceased to think; his motion is even and graceful." A note mentions that the invention was patented by James Means, of Boston, Mass. Anyone interested in obtaining licenses to manufacture it is advised to address Browne & Woodworth, 60 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. Item #66162

James Means, a pioneer of early aviation, was the author of several works on early aeronautics, including "The Problem of Manflight," published in Boston in 1894, several Aeronautical Annuals published between 1895-1897, and a 12 pp. pamphlet, published in 1913, with the same title as this circular.

Price: $85.00

See all items in Americana