AT A FULL MEETING OF SOME OF THE WARMEST ADVOCATES OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY CAUSE IN BOSTON & THE ADJACENT TOWNS, WHO ARE AT THE SAME TIME MEMBERS & FRIENDS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS & THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES.... [followed by an appeal letter addressed to "Dear Friend" soliciting new subscriptions for William Lloyd Garrison's publication "The Liberator]. Francis Jackson.
AT A FULL MEETING OF SOME OF THE WARMEST ADVOCATES OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY CAUSE IN BOSTON & THE ADJACENT TOWNS, WHO ARE AT THE SAME TIME MEMBERS & FRIENDS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS & THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES.... [followed by an appeal letter addressed to "Dear Friend" soliciting new subscriptions for William Lloyd Garrison's publication "The Liberator]
AT A FULL MEETING OF SOME OF THE WARMEST ADVOCATES OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY CAUSE IN BOSTON & THE ADJACENT TOWNS, WHO ARE AT THE SAME TIME MEMBERS & FRIENDS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS & THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES.... [followed by an appeal letter addressed to "Dear Friend" soliciting new subscriptions for William Lloyd Garrison's publication "The Liberator]
AT A FULL MEETING OF SOME OF THE WARMEST ADVOCATES OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY CAUSE IN BOSTON & THE ADJACENT TOWNS, WHO ARE AT THE SAME TIME MEMBERS & FRIENDS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS & THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES.... [followed by an appeal letter addressed to "Dear Friend" soliciting new subscriptions for William Lloyd Garrison's publication "The Liberator]

AT A FULL MEETING OF SOME OF THE WARMEST ADVOCATES OF THE ANTI-SLAVERY CAUSE IN BOSTON & THE ADJACENT TOWNS, WHO ARE AT THE SAME TIME MEMBERS & FRIENDS OF THE MASSACHUSETTS & THE AMERICAN ANTI-SLAVERY SOCIETIES.... [followed by an appeal letter addressed to "Dear Friend" soliciting new subscriptions for William Lloyd Garrison's publication "The Liberator]

[Boston: Jany. 9, 1843]. Contemporary copy (lithograph printing of a manuscript?) of an epistle-style letter written at a meeting of abolitionists in Boston. 36 x 22 cm. 2 leaves, including 2 pp. of text, approx. 1200 words, a page of 15 (lithograph?) signatures, and addressed on the final page to Daniel Carmichel [sic], Brooklyn, NY, with round stamped postal mark "Boston, Feb. 16." Expert repairs to the separation of the leaves at gutter, and to a horizontal split across the central fold, remnants of wax seal on first leaf. The Boston meeting was held at the home of Francis Jackson, Hollis Street, Boston. His name appears at the end of the letter, along with Maria Weston Chapman, Ellis Gray Loring, Sam'l. Philbrick, Thankful Southwick, William Jenkins, Abner Sanger, William Ashby Jr., M.A.W. Johnson, Christopher Robinson, John Rogers, Geo. Bradburn, John A. Collins, Wendell Phillips, and Edmund Quincy.
The members of the meeting resolved that "the Liberator, as the earliest, the ablest, the most powerful & the most successful Anti-Slavery instrumentality through the experience... of its editor William Lloyd Garrison, has a claim on all the friends of the Anti-Slavery cause" and desiring to aid in its circulation, the group produced the text of a letter, included here, and dated Jan. 9, 1843 to be diseminated to "the friends of the cause throughout the country...." This copy was sent to Daniel Carmichel [Carmichael] in Brooklyn, New York.
In the effort to garner support for Garrison's paper, the appeal letter encouraged the addressee to: 1) invite "persons in your immediate neighborhood who already take the Liberator, & whose friendliness to it is undoubted" to private meetings in order to urge them to obtain new participants to the cause; 2) appoint treasurerers to "obtain all the obtainable subscribers the place affords by making personal application to each individual...."; 3) to "send up a call for a public meeting of the friends of The Liberator" to show those who were not aware that Anti-Slavery feeling existed in their neighborhood, that "hearts [were] beating in unison...."; 4) to have their own local Anti-Slavery Society purchase subscription for "gratuitous circulation" in their neighborhood; 5) at all meetings, have a member in charge of soliciting new subscriptions; 6) to collect old debts & solicit donations, as that will enable the committee to send the Liberator "to unbroken fields;" and 7) "To do what is done quickly" to communicate a sense of urgency for awakening "the minds that are just shaking off their prejudices & their enmity...." Item #65196

Daniel Carmichael's copy. In the Annual Reports of the American Anti-Slavery Society, Daniel Carmichael, of Brooklyn, New York, abolitionist, is listed as a member of the Executive Committee, 1843-44, 1845-46. Carmichael was also a board member of Manhattan Anti-Slavery Society, organized by Sydney Gay in ca.1845. [see: "Secret Lives of the Underground Railroad in New York City: Sydney Howard Gay...." by Don Papson & Tom Calarco [McFarland: 2015] pp.36-7.
Francis Jackson (1789-1861) was a leading voice in both the Massachusetts and the American Anti-Slavery Societies, serving as President and Treasurer respectively. His home was a meeting place and sanctuary for the members of the Female Anti-Slavery Society in Boston, and often a shelter for fugitive slaves.

OCLC lists two copies: Swarthmore [addressed to Joseph Post], Boston Public Lib.[addressed to Samuel May]. There also appear to be digital copies.

Price: $3,500.00

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