AT A GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, HOLDEN AT HARTFORD, on the second Thursday of May, 1800.; The following Gentlemen are chosen by the Freemen, to stand in Nomination, for Election in October next, as Representatives of Congress, viz. Connecticut, Election Broadside 1800.

AT A GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF CONNECTICUT, HOLDEN AT HARTFORD, on the second Thursday of May, 1800.; The following Gentlemen are chosen by the Freemen, to stand in Nomination, for Election in October next, as Representatives of Congress, viz.

NP [Hartford, CT?]: [1800]. Broadside. 33.5 x 20 cm. Printed, completed in ink. "Bethlem" written in ink on verso. Old fold lines, with short splits along one fold, not affecting text, some paper loss at edges, browning, few spots. A printed list of eighteen names follows, including the nine Connecticut freemen elected to the general assembly as "at large" members and a list of nine members elected by the individual districts or counties. Numbers of votes are written in for these members. Signed in type by Samuel Wyllys, Secretary. The first set of members named, Chauncey Goodrich, Samuel W. Dana, Roger Griswold, Jonathan Brace, William Edmond, Elizur Goodrich, John C. Smith, John Davenport, and Elias Perkins, were all Federalists, a party which flourished from 1793 to 1816, with remnants lasting into the 1820s. The Federalists controlled the federal government until 1801. The party was formed by Alexander Hamilton who, in about 1792, built a network of supporters in the principal cities to support his fiscal policies. The United States presidential election of 1800, sometimes referred to as the "Revolution of 1800," was a realigning election in which Thomas Jefferson defeated John Adams, ushering in a generation of Democratic-Republican Party rule.
Connecticut had played an important role in the formation of the federal government. The framers of the U.S. Constitution, meeting at Independence Hall, had reached a supremely important agreement. Their so-called Great Compromise (or Connecticut Compromise in honor of its architects, Connecticut delegates Roger Sherman and Oliver Ellsworth) provided a dual system of congressional representation. In the House of Representatives each state would be assigned a number of seats in proportion to its population. In the Senate, all states would have the same number of seats. Not found in OCLC or EVANS. Item #64781

Price: $475.00

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