CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE "CAN'T-GET-AWAY CLUB" OF MOBILE. Instituted December, 1839. Reorganized 22d August, 1853.
CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE "CAN'T-GET-AWAY CLUB" OF MOBILE. Instituted December, 1839. Reorganized 22d August, 1853.

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS OF THE "CAN'T-GET-AWAY CLUB" OF MOBILE. Instituted December, 1839. Reorganized 22d August, 1853.

Mobile [AL]: Shields & Co., Printers, Exchange Alley, 1879. Broadside, 43 x 30 cm., printed on poor quality brown paper. Old fold lines, several short splits and holes to paper, affecting a few words, long separation across the middle fold with repairs on verso with Japanese paper. Round stamp of City of Prichard [AL] on verso. The text is printed in three columns, and includes the 1854 Act of Incorporation, enacted by the state assembly and approved by Gov. John A. Winston, to recognize the club which had "associated themselves together for charitable purposes, under the name of "THE CAN'T-GET-AWAY CLUB," along with the 1879 amended Constitution, and By-laws. A tender copy, encapsulated.
Article I of the constitution states: "The object of this Association shall be to relieve the destitute sick of Epidemic Fevers." Other articles further defined the work of the club: The members were to be resident citizens of the city of Mobile, "as defined in the City limits of the year 1878." Members of the Executive Committee were to appoint assistants in each ward to "procure hospitals for the indigent sick, to select physicians and nurses, and to make all contracts for the Club. They shall, during an epidemic, report daily to the President." Club members were forbidden from taking payment for their work. Item #64775

The "Can't-Get-Away Club" was founded by a group of businessmen, religious leaders, and civic-minded citizens in 1839 to address the yellow fever epidemic that was ravaging the city. These men chose to remain in Mobile rather than escape, and do what they could to help their fellow citizens. The limited number of physicians, the cost of nursing help, access to hospitals, medicines and food assistance for the sick and their families all needed to be addressed. The club collected funds from its members and solicited donations, organizing assistance ward by ward. During the 19th century, it even expanded its reach sending nurses to Memphis and New Orleans to help combat the disease. The club continued to be a part of Mobile's response to the several yellow fever epidemics until the last outbreak in 1897. [see: Thomas McAdory Owen's "History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama," (S.J. Clarke Co.: 1921), Vol. 1, pp.200-1].

No copies of this broadside found on OCLC, which does list one copy of a 16pp. pamphlet with this title, at Birmingham-Jefferson Public Library.

Price: $850.00

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