MERCANTILE ACCOUNT BOOK FROM GARROTE NO.1 [Groveland], TUOLUMNE COUNTY, IN GOLD RUSH ERA CALIFORNIA, RECORDING SUPPLIES PURCHASED BY MINERS, MOUNTAINEERS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES, 1855-59, ACCOMPANIED BY A LEDGER FROM THE HOTEL IN GARROTE OWNED BY ELIZABETH BOUTILLIER, 1866-1884, AND HER HUSBAND BENJAMIN L. SAVORY, AND BY A LEDGER BELONGING TO SAVORY, A VEGETABLE MERCHANT IN SAN FRANCISCO BEFORE THEIR MARRIAGE, 1859-62.
MERCANTILE ACCOUNT BOOK FROM GARROTE NO.1 [Groveland], TUOLUMNE COUNTY, IN GOLD RUSH ERA CALIFORNIA, RECORDING SUPPLIES PURCHASED BY MINERS, MOUNTAINEERS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES, 1855-59, ACCOMPANIED BY A LEDGER FROM THE HOTEL IN GARROTE OWNED BY ELIZABETH BOUTILLIER, 1866-1884, AND HER HUSBAND BENJAMIN L. SAVORY, AND BY A LEDGER BELONGING TO SAVORY, A VEGETABLE MERCHANT IN SAN FRANCISCO BEFORE THEIR MARRIAGE, 1859-62.
MERCANTILE ACCOUNT BOOK FROM GARROTE NO.1 [Groveland], TUOLUMNE COUNTY, IN GOLD RUSH ERA CALIFORNIA, RECORDING SUPPLIES PURCHASED BY MINERS, MOUNTAINEERS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES, 1855-59, ACCOMPANIED BY A LEDGER FROM THE HOTEL IN GARROTE OWNED BY ELIZABETH BOUTILLIER, 1866-1884, AND HER HUSBAND BENJAMIN L. SAVORY, AND BY A LEDGER BELONGING TO SAVORY, A VEGETABLE MERCHANT IN SAN FRANCISCO BEFORE THEIR MARRIAGE, 1859-62.

MERCANTILE ACCOUNT BOOK FROM GARROTE NO.1 [Groveland], TUOLUMNE COUNTY, IN GOLD RUSH ERA CALIFORNIA, RECORDING SUPPLIES PURCHASED BY MINERS, MOUNTAINEERS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES, 1855-59, ACCOMPANIED BY A LEDGER FROM THE HOTEL IN GARROTE OWNED BY ELIZABETH BOUTILLIER, 1866-1884, AND HER HUSBAND BENJAMIN L. SAVORY, AND BY A LEDGER BELONGING TO SAVORY, A VEGETABLE MERCHANT IN SAN FRANCISCO BEFORE THEIR MARRIAGE, 1859-62.

[1855-1884]. Three manuscript ledgers, folio, two bound in contemporary calf, one in marbled boards, a total of approx. 595 pp.
The earliest account ledger, 1855-1859, likely belongs to James Tannahill, a merchant in the small mining town of Garrote No. 1, Tuolumne County, California. Lacking the first 26 pages, it is identified with the town of Garrote via the names of the customers, occasional children's pencil notations, and one note mentioning an amount "transferred from Tannahill Ledger A." It is bound in contemporary calf, with a leather spine label, stamped "Journal" in gilt, well worn, front hinge cracked. Printed stationer's label of San Francisco Bookseller & Importer J. McGlashan & Co. on front pastedown. 39 cm. approx. 342 pp. Some pages torn or removed, several pages with children's drawings in blank spaces or penciling over some entries, pressed flowers in the gutters of some pages.
The second ledger, 1859-1862, records the San Francisco business of vegetable merchant Benjamin L. Savory, and Savory & Co., No. 9 Washington Market. Bound in contemporary calf (rubbed), marbled endpapers. 33 cm. approx. 185 pp. Pressed flowers within the pages have left marks at gutters. Savory's name and address appears on the recto of the front endpaper, before the tabbed alphabetical pages of customers. There is also a note indicating he bought out his partner Cheney in 1863, then sold his stand to Moore & Co. in 1865.
The third ledger belongs to "Miss E. Boutillier, Garrote No. 1, Nov. 17, 1866" [her name on front pastedown]. Elizabeth Boutillier was proprietor of the Washington Hotel in Garrote No. 1, and this ledger lists guest's charges for dinner, drinks, boarding, hay for horses, and the occasional billiard game, 1866-1884. Bound in contemporary calf-backed marbled boards (marbling partly torn away from front board). Printed stationer's label of San Francisco Bookseller, Publisher, and Book Manufacturer Henry Payot on front pastedown. 31 cm. approx. 68 pp. Benjamin Savory moved from San Francisco to Garrote No. 1 sometime after 1865, married Elizabeth Boutillier and became proprietor of this hotel which was later renamed Savory Hotel. Local history also attributes the change in the town's name to him, from Garrote to Groveland in about 1875. Item #64702

When gold was discovered in California in 1848, the area which became Tuolumne County in 1850 was found to contain some of the richest gold placers in the state. Called the Mother Lode, this area just west of Yosemite swarmed with miners, and the settlements of Big Oak Flats, Garrote No. 1 and Garrote N. 2 sprang up. Local history indicates that the two Garrotes got their names from a couple of hangings of gold dust thieves during those early years.
James Tannahill (1824-1884) arrived in the area in about 1850, first as a miner, then as a store keeper in Garrote No. 1, according to H.O. Lang's "History of Tuolumne County," [San Francisco: 1882]. At first he had a partner, J.H. Watts. Tax rolls for the county in the 1850s list both Tannahill and Watts as owners of "both a stone building... and a neighboring two story adobe structure." Watts sold out to Tannahill in 1868. Besides the mercantile business, Tannahill was also post master of the town from 1863-1880. The first ledger in this group lists the names of many locals who purchased supplies from the store including Otis Perrin, Charles Elwell, Nathan Screech, Jacinto Rodriguez, Wilson Duckworth, Celestial Tucker, Matthew Foote, Maxcy & Simms, Hubbard Blye & Co., etc. [Nathan Screech is considered the first non-native American to have entered the Hetch Hetchy Valley]. There was a thriving Chinese Camp of miners and the store served them as well: An Foo, An Sam, An Te, As Syr, Le Wau, etc. The miners purchased a variety of items, presumably to outfit themselves as they prospected for gold, including axe handles, picks, shovels, candles, gold pans, matches, overalls, rope, powder and fuses, camphine, camp kettles and the like, along with coffee, tobacco, rice, salertus, and of course whisky. The store also supplied the surveying party for the Golden Rock Water Company, and provided provisions for the Jackson Tunnelling Company. Though Tannahill's name only appears once in this mercantile ledger book, the customers help establish its likely ownership. Contributing to the identification are the childrens drawings and doodles, with the accompanying signatures of Maggie (or Margrette) Reid, and Thomas C. Reid, of Groveland, Tuolumne County. [The Thomas Reid family lived in the area from the 1850s well into the 20th century, according to the reminiscences of Anna Jones Reid (1862-1953). She and her husband Thomas R. Reid (1856-1936) had several children, including Maggie and Thomas C., and were proprietors of the Savory Hotel in the 1880s. (see: Irene Paden & Margaret Schlichtmann's history "The Big Oak Flat Road," San Francisco: 1955).
Otis Perrin was one of the proprietors of the Golden Rock Water Company which constructed a thirteen mile ditch for irrigating purposes on the Tuolumne River, to divert water from the South Fork and transport it to the Garrotes and Big Oak Flat. He was also owner of the Washington Hotel for ten years, purchased by Elizabeth Boutillier in the 1860s.
Benjamin Savory (1832-1903) arrived in San Francisco, California from Massachusetts in the 1850s. Colville's San Francisco Directory for 1856 lists him as a clerk, boarding at the Niantic Hotel in the city. By 1858, he is listed in the San Francisco Directory as Savory & Co., proprietor of a wholesale vegetable business, with J[esse] Cheney, at 9 Washington Market. The second ledger in this group lists his customers as the U.S.M. Hospital, Tremont House, Isthmus House, Lyon & Son, Oak Knoll Asparagus, Beardslee and Hooker, the International Hotel, and numerous Steamers- the Golden Age, Columbia, Sonora, Golden Gate, Panama, etc. Most of his wares are simply described as "vegetables." By 1863, when he bought out his partner Jesse Cheney, their accounts balanced out at $21,899.70 each. After he sold his business to Moore & Co. in 1865, he apparently moved to Garrote No. 1.
The third ledger, belonging to Elizabeth Boutillier (c.1840-?), a French woman, lists entries for lodging, dinner, drinks, billiards, casino and double games for numerous customers including Augustus De Prat, Frank Shattuck, Newhall & Culbertson, James Tannahill, George Goodhart, Capt. Walters, Thomas Reid, William Screech, etc. A Mr. Hutchings, Yosemite, is charged for board and meals for W. Bowen and F. Bailey on occasional stays between May and Sept. 1870, and June-August 1871. By 1867, Boutillier had married Benjamin L. Savory and they were operating the hotel together. California Voter Registers for Tuolumne County list him as a hotel keeper in First Garrote as of August 1867. The hotel, renamed the Savory Hotel in the 1870s, was directly across the street from Tannahill's store. The Reids bought the hotel in the early 1880s and Mrs. Reid describes it as "just an ordinary mountain hotel. The boarders were mostly miners. No woman or child ever set foot in the bar." Savory and his wife apparently moved on again after selling the hotel. Records indicate he died in Salt Lake City in 1903, and there is some hint he had become a Mormon.

Price: $4,500.00

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