BOUNDARY DISPUTES ASSOCIATED WITH CRANDALL FAMILY MEMBERS, CANTERBURY, CONNECTICUT. TWO LEGAL PAPERS, DATED 1828 AND 1880, CONCERNING FENCES AND PROPERTY INFRINGEMENTS. Connecticut, Hezekiah Crandall.

BOUNDARY DISPUTES ASSOCIATED WITH CRANDALL FAMILY MEMBERS, CANTERBURY, CONNECTICUT. TWO LEGAL PAPERS, DATED 1828 AND 1880, CONCERNING FENCES AND PROPERTY INFRINGEMENTS.

[Canterbury, CT: 1828, 1880]. Two manuscript documents, folio & octavo, a total of 2 1/2 pp. The first is a contemporary copy of a document signed by the Selectmen of the town of Canterbury, Connecticut, giving Joseph R. Willoughby thirty days to remove a fence which encroached on part of the Norwich and Woodstock turnpike road, near "Nathan Adams' house occupied by Pardon Crandall...." Single sheet, 32 cm., 1 1/2pp., approx. 240 words, dated Nov. 28, 1828. The selectmen included Thomas Kingsley, Walter Smith, Festus Baldwin, and Andrew T. Judson. On the verso is a note attesting that Horace Bacon, Constable, had served the proper notice to Joseph R. Willoughby.
The second document is a single sheet of lined paper, 20cm., 1p., approx. 190 words. ALS deposition to the Selectmen of Canterbury from Hezekiah Crandall, Elk Falls, Kansas, Dec. 6, 1880. Old fold lines, a short closed tear, slight fading of ink, legible. The deposition was written at the request of George Rowland of Canterbury and concerns the fence between him and A.H. Benet and the Levalley farm & the old longhouse garden & factory premises. Levalley was one-quarter owner of the factories and lands and joined with the company to build the fence. Crandall had married Levalley's widow and managed the Levalley farm for twenty years "and supported the walls and fences on all sides against us. I had to buy my peace with Mr. Benet by doing up all the fence at my own expense.... I added over 30 loads of stone to the fences." Item #64509

Pardon Crandall (1778-1838), mentioned in the first document as residing in Nathan Adams' house, was the father of Hezekiah and Prudence Crandall. Hezekiah married Patience, the widow of mill owner William Levally in 1852, and is listed as a cotton manufacturer in Canterbury, Connecticut in both the 1860 and the 1870 Census. Sometime in the 1870s, he and Patience moved to Elk Falls, Kansas. His sister Prudence Crandall (1803-1890) joined him there after her own husband died in 1874. Prudence was a Quaker abolitionist and founder of a school for young women from the well-to-do families in Canterbury in 1831. When she admitted an African American student in 1832 she ran afoul of the local populace who withdrew their daughters from the school. She converted her academy to a boarding school for African American women. In 1833 the town of Canterbury passed the "Black Law," making it illegal to educate African Americans who came from outside the state. Crandall was arrested and tried for defying the law. [One of the selectmen who signed the 1828 deposition, Andrew T. Judson, was a judge at her trial]. Crandall's students were often the subjects of taunts and abuse, and in 1834 the school was attacked by a mob which broke windows and smashed furniture. For the safety of the students she finally closed the school. In 1835, she married and left the state for Illinois.

Price: $450.00

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