THE DOWNFAL OF TYRANNY [caption title]

THE DOWNFAL OF TYRANNY [caption title]

[Philadelphia: 1832]. Broadside political cartoon, 9 x 10.25 in., trimmed to the neat lines at both sides, and closely trimmed top and bottom. A dramatic, boldly printed lithograph of a helmeted winged warrior, "The People's Champion" printed on a ribbon floating above his head, holding a shield emblazoned with the word "Patriotism" and wielding a sword labeled "Resolution." He stands with his foot on the back of a prostrate figure with a serpent coiled around his body who is lying on scrolls of paper labeled "Veto," "Corruption," "Treachery," "Nullification," "Calumny / The Globe," and "Kitchen Cabinet." The figure of justice, with her balance scales in one hand and a sword in the other appears in the upper right corner, standing on a platform with a dog beside her, and an owl on a branch below the platform. A small column holds a tipping hourglass labeled "The Last Sand." Under the warrior's right foot is another scroll printed with "Kendall & Co. Administration." Above the image are printed the words "Is There Aught in This to Give Offence," and below the image, "A Copy of the Transparency destroyed on the day of Election 1832: as exhibited on the front of Mr. Carle's Bolivar House, Chestnut St., Philadelphia." Some toning and light soiling, a couple of small pinholes, one closed tear at lower margin, slightly affecting a letter or two. One copy found at the Hagley Museum, measuring 11.75 x 10.25 in.; the Library Company of Philadelphia adds a copy. Item #64440

During the Presidential election of 1832, pitting the incumbent Andrew Jackson against Henry Clay, the anti-Jackson party of Philadelphia was headquartered in the Bolivar House Hotel on Chestnut Street. They had placed "the arms of Virginia, as a transparency, in a window of their headquarters.... On the day of the State election some astute Democrat discovered that the prostrate figure above the legend, 'Sic Semper Tyrannis,' was intended for Gen. Jackson. This discovery gave great offense to Jackson's friends, and they made an attack upon the offending emblem, doing much injury to the house." [see: "Memorial History of the City of Philadelphia," John Russell Young (ed.), NY: 1898, vol. II, p.212].
This broadside, apparently a recreation of the offending one, translated the Virginia motto into the caption title "The Downfal [sic] of Tyranny," and showed the winged people's champion stepping on both Pres. Jackson and on symbols of Jackson's influential "kitchen cabinet," which included Amos Kendall. Kendall had mounted an editorial campaign in the Globe newspaper against the Bank of the United States, and was a prominent member of this group of unofficial advisors to the President.

Price: $4,500.00

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