NEW IDEAS ON POPULATION: with Remark on the Theories of Malthus and Godwin. [And] Nouvelles Idees sur La Population, avec des Remarques sur les Theories de Malthus et de Godwin. Alexander H. Everett.
NEW IDEAS ON POPULATION: with Remark on the Theories of Malthus and Godwin. [And] Nouvelles Idees sur La Population, avec des Remarques sur les Theories de Malthus et de Godwin.
NEW IDEAS ON POPULATION: with Remark on the Theories of Malthus and Godwin. [And] Nouvelles Idees sur La Population, avec des Remarques sur les Theories de Malthus et de Godwin.

NEW IDEAS ON POPULATION: with Remark on the Theories of Malthus and Godwin. [And] Nouvelles Idees sur La Population, avec des Remarques sur les Theories de Malthus et de Godwin.

Boston: Oliver Everett; Paris: Jules Renouard, 1823; 1826. First edition. 8vo. 21 cm. 125pp. Bound with the first French edition (Paris: Jules Renouard, 1826); 125 pp. Later full leather, darkening to spine, gilt rules and gilt stamping on spine label. Some foxing to endpapers of American edition and foxing to text of French edition. Front joint cracked, rear starting, laid down on front pastedown is large printed bookplate of Library of the Newton Theological Institution. An early American response to Malthus. Sabin 23233. American Imprints.12482.
Alexander Hall Everett (1792-1847) was an American diplomat, who served in Europe as charge-d'affaires to The Hague from 1818 to 1824, then minister to Spain from 1825 to 1829. His "New Ideas on Population" was first published in Boston in 1823 and reprinted in London the same year. A second Boston edition appeared the same year as the first French translation (and the sixth edition of Malthus's Essay). Schumpeter notes that Everett "was perfectly right to call his book New Ideas on Population (1823). For his main point, viz., that increase in population means increased production of food and is likely to induce improvements in the methods of its production, was new in his day, much more so at any rate than anything Malthus ever said. It introduced one of the two relations that are lacking in Malthus between the increase of population and the increase of subsistence, and in general presented, quite independently of the specifically American elements of its argument, a useful approach to the population problem as a whole" (History of Economic Analysis, 1994, p. 553). Goldsmiths' 23786. Item #63876

Price: $2,500.00

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