An Inaugural Oration, on the Progress and Importance of the Mathematical Sciences, Delivered at Princeton, on the Evening Preceding the Annual Commencement, 1788. Walter MINTO.
An Inaugural Oration, on the Progress and Importance of the Mathematical Sciences, Delivered at Princeton, on the Evening Preceding the Annual Commencement, 1788
An Inaugural Oration, on the Progress and Importance of the Mathematical Sciences, Delivered at Princeton, on the Evening Preceding the Annual Commencement, 1788
An Inaugural Oration, on the Progress and Importance of the Mathematical Sciences, Delivered at Princeton, on the Evening Preceding the Annual Commencement, 1788

An Inaugural Oration, on the Progress and Importance of the Mathematical Sciences, Delivered at Princeton, on the Evening Preceding the Annual Commencement, 1788

[bound with nine other College of New Jersey (i.e., Princeton University) commencement orations, 1831-1836, seven catalogues of Princeton students and faculty members, 1834-1841, 12 small broadsides printing Princeton commencement exercises, 1836-1841, and two New Jersey State Agricultural Society related pamphlets, 1839-1840]. Trenton, (NJ): Printed by Isaac Collins, 1788. First edition. 8vo. (51) pp. "Minto was a Scottish mathematician and astronomer who emigrated to America in 1786 ... [The following year] he was named professor of mathematics and natural philosophy in the College of New Jersey, where he remained until his death nine years later" (Felcone). Evans 21260. Karpinski 87: "The first American contribution to the history of mathematics." Felcone 140: "The first American contribution to the history of mathematics, as well as the earliest American analysis and appreciation of the work of Isaac Newton." Noll "Princeton and the Republic, 1768-1822": "[Minto's] inaugural address exhibited a method of uniting natural philosophy and natural theology that, if it did not use language customary to all the trustees, still won their approval. Minto's address offered an occasion to rehearse the slow advance of the human mind until the recent unfolding of the active genius of man with Copernicus, Descartes, and others who paved the way for Isaac Newton, 'a man without an equal in the history of human genius.'" Full descriptions of the 29 pamphlets and handbills bound with the Minto oration, many of which seem to be quite scarce, will be provided upon request. Owner's stamp on front pastedown. Very good. Mid 19th-century half-leather and marbled boards, red morocco spine label ("College Addresses, Catalogues, &c."), small paper label at base of spine reads "1842, spine gilt-stamped "1842". (#4387). Item #57259

Price: $2,500.00

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