QUIVIRA SOCIETY PUBLICATIONS. COMPLETE SET OF 13 VOLUMES, IN 15 PARTS.

Los Angeles [or Berkeley], CA: The Quivira Society, 1929-1958. First edition, 13 titles in 15 volumes, each limited, from 400 to 665 copies. 8vo. Illustrated with plates and folding maps. Number 1: Expedition into New Mexico Made by Antonio de Espejo, 1582-1583, as Revealed in the Journal of Diego Perez de Luxan, a Member of the Party. Translated, with introduction and notes, by George P. Hammond and Agapito Rey (1929, 143 pp.; Howes P-226); Number II: The Indian Uprising in Lower California, 1734-1737, as Described by Father Sigismundo Taraval. Translated, with introduction and notes, by Marguerite E. Wilbur (1931, 298 pp.); Number III: The Mercurio Volante of Don Carlos de Siguenza y Gongora, an Account of the First Expedition of Don Diego de Vargas into New Mexico in 1692. Translated, with introduction and notes, by Irving A. Leonard (1932, 136 pp.; Howes S-455: "Best contemporary chronicle of the 1692 reconquest of New Mexico by Vargas"); Number IV: History of New Mexico by Gaspar Perez de Villagra, Alcala, 1610. Translated by Gilberto Espinosa; introduction and notes by F.W. Hodge. (1933, 308 pp); Number V: Diary of the Alarcon Expedition into Texas, 1718-1719, by Fray Francisco Celiz. Translated by Fritz L. Hoffmann (1935, 124 pp.; Howes C-254: "Celiz accompanied this expedition which established Spanish government and missions in the region"); Number VI: History of Texas, 1673-1779, by Fray Juan Agustin Morfi. Translated, with biographical introduction and annotations, by Carlos E. Castaneda (1935, 2 volumes: 496, 242 pp.; Howes M-792: "Most complete history of Spanish Texas in its early period"; inscribed by the translator to Fred Chabot at the head of the title page, and with some of Chabot's markings in the text); Number VII: The Spanish Southwest, 1542-1794, an Annotated Bibliography, by Henry R. Wagner (1937, 2 volumes: 270; [271]-553 pp.); Number VIII: New Mexico in 1602, Juan de Montoya's Relation of the Discovery of New Mexico, edited by George P. Hammond and Agapito Rey (1938, 143 pp.); Number IX: Spanish Approach to Pensacola, 1689-1693. Translated, with introduction and notes, by Irving A.Leonard; foreword by James A. Robertson (1939, 323 pp.); Number X: A Scientist on the Trail, Travel Letters of A.F. Bandelier, 1880-1881, edited by George P. Hammond and Edgar F. Goad (1949, 142 pp.); Number XI: Three New Mexico Chronicles, the Exposicion of Don Pedro Bautista Pino, 1812, the Ojeada of Lic. Antonio Barreiro, 1832, and the additions by Don Jose Agustin de Escudero, 1849. Translated, with introduction and notes, by H. Bailey Carroll and J. Villasana Haggard (1942, 342 pp.; cf. Howes P-383: "Chief source on New Mexico's last years as a Spanish province and of her beginnings as a Mexican state"); Number XII: Instructions for Governing the Interior Provinces of New Spain, 1786, by Bernardo de Galvez. Translated and edited by Donald E. Worcester. (1951, 150 pp.); Number XIII: The Frontiers of New Spain, Nicolas de LaFora's Description, 1766-1768, edited by Lawrence Kinnaird (1958, 243 pp.). Original parchment or white-cloth backed boards (some wear to spine ends on volume one, some soiling to other volumes). Light old tideline in outer margin a number of rear leaves in volume one, but a very good set, not often encountered complete (all of the volumes in this set issued with the same number, except for the Casteneda). (2620). Item #56107

Price: $4,000.00

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