REBEL RAID IN SOUTHEAST / MISSOURI. / ATTACK UPON PATTERSON. / FIGHT BETWEEN 1,500 OF THE ENEMY / AND 400 FEDERALS. / THE LATTER FALL BACK TO BIG / CREEK. / INTERESTING DISPATCH FROM PILOT KNOB. / MAJOR McCONNELL REPORTED MORTALLY / WOUNDED AND A PRISONER. / THE INCURSION AT AN END. [caption title] [followed by 69 lines of text]. Edwin Smart, Col. Com'dg.

REBEL RAID IN SOUTHEAST / MISSOURI. / ATTACK UPON PATTERSON. / FIGHT BETWEEN 1,500 OF THE ENEMY / AND 400 FEDERALS. / THE LATTER FALL BACK TO BIG / CREEK. / INTERESTING DISPATCH FROM PILOT KNOB. / MAJOR McCONNELL REPORTED MORTALLY / WOUNDED AND A PRISONER. / THE INCURSION AT AN END. [caption title] [followed by 69 lines of text]

[NP: 1863]. Narrow folio broadside. 35 x 11 cm. Slight browning and spotting, faint remains of tape [from posting?] along top edge, but very good. The notice states: "Intelligence reached the city last evening that Marmaduke, with four thousand men and artillery, was advancing upon Patterson, where only a few hundred Federals were posted. Subsequent and reliable information reduced the number of the invaders to 1,500 or 2,000 and rendered it certain that they had attacked Patterson and met a vigourous resistance from the troops under Col. Smart." Col. Smart's dispatch, received by Gen. Davidson and reprinted here, dated at Pilot Knob, [Missouri], on April 21st, contains his report outlining the skirmishes. Smart, commanding the Third Missouri State Militia Cavalry at Patterson, Missouri was nearly taken by surprise by a large force of Confederates under the command of Brig. General John S. Marmaduke. Marmaduke intended to encircle the town and capture Union stores there. Smart had been cautioned by Gen. Davidson to be prepared to move at a moment's notice and he put those orders immediately into practice: "The attack began about twelve o'clock, on Reeves's Station road, with a scout I had sent out in that direction. I then sent Major Wood [sic: Richard G. Woodson] on to reinforce, with a battalion. He held them in check, and skirmished them into town. This gave me time to load my trains, and have them ready to move if I had to retreat. Before I left the town I destroyed what stores I could not bring away. Norhing fell into the hands of the enemy." Item #63946

The Union Army had established a string of outposts in Missouri to prevent the state from falling into Confederate hands. Patterson, the farthest south, was a central crossroads in southeast Missouri, occupied by Col. Smart's unmounted cavalry of some 400-500 men, with a telegraph line running from the town to Pilot Knob and on to St. Louis and Union headquarters. Construction had begun on Fort Benton near the town in November 1862. In hopes of dislodging the Union hold on Missouri, Confederate Gen. Marmaduke and some 5000 troops consisting of Shelby's Missouri cavalry brigade, Greene's Missouri cavalry brigade, Carter's Texas cavalry brigade, Burbridge's brigade of both his Missouri cavalry regiment and Newton's Arkansas cavalry regiment descended on the town, cutting the telegraph lines. Though they succeeded in capturing Patterson and moving further into Missouri, they were repulsed at Cape Girardeau and retreated back into Arkansas. Union forces reoccupied the town by late May. [see: NPS National Register of Historic Places report on Fort Benton, Oct. 1990].

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Price: $1,750.00

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